An Interview with Kate Foster: Student of the Semester!

CYA student Kate Foster has been making the most of her time in Greece.

A self-proclaimed mythology fan, Kate was attracted to Greece’s rich history long before she arrived here. For her, living in Athens has provided her the chance to explore various aspects of the country’s history. She has had the chance to visit famous ancient sites from the Acropolis to the temple at Delphi to the palace of Knossos. Just two weeks ago, Kate even ran the 5k race of the Athens Authentic Marathon. But these experiences are only one part of her study abroad experience.  

As a biology major, most of Kate’s classes here are aimed to fulfill her general education requirements back at her home institution of University of North Carolina Chapel Hill. However, she has been doing much more than just studying. When she’s not in class or on CYA field trips, she dedicates a lot of her time to volunteering in the local community. Every week, Kate has been shadowing well-known surgeon Doctor Spyros Smparounis at the Metropolitan General Hospital.

When the doctor has patients, Kate interacts with them firsthand, learning about their illness and how to treat them with the Doctor. Kate even had the opportunity to witness a surgery in the room! On less busy days, Dr. Smparounis gives Kate lessons about illnesses and medical emergencies and how to treat them. As an EMT, Kate was interested in the differences between the Greek and American healthcare systems. Here in Greece, there is a universal healthcare program as well as private options. Meanwhile, in America, healthcare is mainly private. This week, Kate will sit in on a lesson from Dr. Smparounis about the cutting edge da Vinci Robotic Surgery System. Getting the chance to work closely with a renowned surgeon and developing a friendship is “once in a lifetime” Kate declared.

When she’s not working with Dr. Smparounis at the hospital, Kate also been volunteering with an organization called Medical Volunteers International (MVI). MVI is a non-profit that provides medical assistance to refugees. Once a week, Kate goes to one of their women and children’s clinics and assists doctors as they see patients. On their busiest day, fourteen patients came through during the few hours she was there. She gets to work alongside the doctors as they listen to patients about their symptoms, ask follow-up questions, and determine a diagnosis.

Unlike at many internship and volunteering experiences in the US, at MVI Kate gets to provide real input and contributions to the doctors she works with. She says that this work has given her the chance to see “what’s actually going on and how the process occurs and to look at the symptoms and go ‘okay, I think it’s this.’” Every time she goes in, she gets another opportunity to put the skills and knowledge she has gained in the classroom to the test.

One of Kate’s favorite parts of her volunteer work is that she feels she’s been able to provide more continuity at the clinic than usual. The doctors she works with are volunteering their time and efforts, so they often stay for about two weeks before switching out with a new doctor. Kate, on the other hand, has been helping at the clinic every week since mid-September. Since she has been coming for weeks now, she feels confident helping doctors recognize recurring patients and checking on their previous problems before helping them with new ones.

This is far from Kate’s first time venturing out into the medical field. She is a certified EMT, has worked in a burn clinic and trauma center, and has shadowed a variety of different medical professionals already. But even with all this experience under her belt already, she feels that her experiences here in Greece have been unique. While shadowing in the US is just “watching,” she describes her work here shadowing and with the volunteer organization as more “interactive” and “involved.” She’s had the chance to speak up and give her opinion to real medical professionals in a way that she hasn’t had the chance to in the US. While she has loved the work she has done in the US previously, she admits that “it’s one thing to learn it in the classroom but its another to actually go and to see what you’re learning in class in action and to see the consequences of it.” In her volunteer work here in Greece, Kate has gotten to witness the healing impact her help has had on real people.

This healing impact is all the more meaningful because Medical Volunteers International assists refugees. For Kate, this has been different than caring for patients at a hospital back in the US. Without the work of organizations like MVI, it can be extremely difficult for refugees to find medical care. In countries like Greece, where so many refugees have arrived in the past few years, this kind of humanitarian aid is critical. By seeing up close the situations of these refugees, Kate has gained more than just medical experience from her volunteering – she feels that her work at MVI has “opened up a whole new realm of sympathy.”

When it comes to for future CYA student who are considering volunteering, Kate’s advice was simple: “don’t be hesitant… it’s going to be great.”

For her amazing work throughout her time at CYA, Kate has been named the Student of the Semester for fall ’19! Bravo Kate!

The University Costs You Need to Budget For

It does not matter what you choose to study at university, you need to make sure that you have the funding to do it. Everybody knows that you have to pay tuition fees when you attend university. This is something that is not a surprise. But a lot of students do not realize that there are other costs and expenses you need to budget for too. Let’s take a look at what you can expect so that you are financially prepared.

 

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A Laptop and Other Technology

Heading off to university may mean that you have to update your technology for your studies. In particular, a lot of students need their own laptops in order to complete research, reading lists and take notes in classes. Of course, this can be a big expense that you have to make before your semester starts. In addition, you may want to invest in other technology to make your studying sessions easier, such as a printer. 

Accommodation

If you are studying in another state, you are going to have to move out of your family home and choose a dorm. This can be a very exciting experience and a great opportunity to make friends and grow as a person. But it does require a lot of money. Unfortunately, if your university is far from home, you do not have a choice. This is when you have to wring as much as you can from the money you have in your available budget

As an example, Dominique Broadway is an award-winning personal finance expert. She offers some excellent advice about where and how to source the best student loans, to help you manage your finances better by helping individuals make better and more informed financial decisions. 

Books and Learning Materials

Back in high school, a lot of learning materials and textbooks are provided for you. At university, the core reading materials for your course will not be the same. Some books may be available in your library. But most of them you will have to buy each semester. This can soon add up, especially if you buy them new. You may be able to get your hands on some used materials. Otherwise, you are going to have to budget for these if you want to pass your course.

The Graduation Ceremony

If you have just started university, you may not even be thinking about graduation yet. But there is one reason why you should and that is because of the cost. By the end of your education, you may be low on savings. Expenses can take their toll on your bank account. But you need to make sure that you have some money stored away so that you can properly celebrate your graduation. You have worked very hard over the years and finally gained your degree. You will need enough money for your gown and hat hire, as well as your tickets to graduation. There are usually two to four tickets for your loved ones and they all cost money. In addition, there are special mementos you can purchase and official photographs.

How to Teach Someone English

Being a native speaker of English is sometimes said to be ‘all you need’ to teach someone English. However, anyone with a TESOL qualification will tell you that there are vital skills you need to learn to become a good teacher. Even with a TESOL certificate, there are certain points you need to keep in mind when teaching someone English. If you want to know how to teach someone English, read our list of top tips to hone your teaching expertise.

Assess Their Level

Knowing your student’s level is a vital element to teaching appropriate and successful lessons. If you’re teaching for an online platform, they might have already assessed the student’s level before introducing you to them, and in both online and face-to-face classes of multiple learners, the students are often grouped together by level. However, if you’re teaching freelance or on a platform without a pre-class level check, you’ll have to do it yourself.

The best way to gage a student’s ability is to ascertain their CEFR level. CEFR stands for Common European Framework of Reference for Languages, and it’s a guideline for all language abilities (not just English) that’s used all over the world. Most schools and platforms will divide students by their CEFR level, as well as using their own in-house levels (particularly for young learners or beginners). A1 and A2 are beginner level (absolute beginner and elementary), B1 and B2 are independent users (intermediate and upper intermediate), while C1 and C2 are proficient users (advanced and mastery).

To give your student a placement test, look at various ‘can do’ statements from each level of the CEFR and see whether or not the student can produce the language for that level. For example, can they introduce themselves and ask introductory questions? (A1 ability). Can they describe hopes and ambitions, giving reasons and explanations? (B2 ability). Details of the CEFR levels and what questions to ask the student can be found online.

Knowing what your student’s level is will help you to tailor lesson content to their ability, check their progress over time, and ensure that their lessons are challenging enough without being too difficult. A good tip to remember is that a student should already know 70% of the language used in a class, with 30% new material. Too much new material and they won’t remember it, nor will they understand the classroom activities.

 Find Out Their Goals

Knowing a student’s ability is the most important, but a close second is finding out why they’re learning English. If a student has enrolled on a course hoping to learn Medical English and you teach them English for Tourism, the lessons will be useless to them. 

Students learn for all sorts of reasons, and there are a huge number of specialised courses and topics you might be asked to teach: Business English, English for Academic Purposes, English for Pilots, etc. Some students are working towards passing a certain exam, such as IELTS. But also remember that many students are learning English for fun, and have no specific goals other than to achieve an intermediate or advanced level. 

Some students have no set language goals but are learning for a purpose, such as to prepare for a holiday abroad or a university degree. Also, you might meet some students who have no goals because they don’t want to learn English. Some employers enrol their staff on language courses which are mandatory, and for these students who are learning by force rather than through passion, motivation can be an issue. If this is the case, try to keep lessons light-hearted and fun as well as covering the content set out by the employer.

Cater to All Skill Sets

People often focus on speaking when it comes to learning a language, but this is just one of several important skills. Reading, writing, listening, speaking, vocabulary and grammar practice are all important elements of the language lesson. Try to keep a good balance of activities that focus on different skills when you’re teaching someone English, even if the student wants to focus on one skill in particular.

Learning Style and Student Types

We all learn in different ways, a fact that can make it difficult to cater for individual learning styles when teaching group classes. There are four student types – visual, auditory, kinaesthetic and combination. Broadly speaking, we’re all combination learners, but from time to time you’ll meet students who are much more productive and motivated when doing certain tasks. 

Students who respond well to oral dictations are auditory learners. Those who flourish with gap-fill activities or picture matching will be visual. A kinaesthetic learner needs to be active, not just listening and taking notes, and might benefit from games that get them up and moving rather than stuck at the desk. Keeping different learning styles in mind will help you to create tailored lessons when teaching someone English.

Respect Their Cultural Quirks

When it comes to language learning, there’s no one-size-fits-all. If you teach students from different places around the world, you’ll soon see that there are general traits when it comes to your student’s attitudes and confidence. Chinese students will be mortified and clam up if you ask them to talk about relationships with their peers, whereas a chatty Spanish student will love dishing up the latest gossip. A Japanese student might be shy and not want to engage in creative or imaginative activities, whereas a passionate Italian will love a chance to use language fluently. While there are always those who buck the trend, as a TESOL teacher you need to anticipate how your students will react to certain activities and what’s appropriate when teaching them English.

Plan Student Centred Lessons

Each lesson you teach should have a clear goal, one that is completely focussed on the student and what you hope they’ll achieve. Each lesson plan you write should start with the words ‘By the end of the lesson, the student will be able to…’ This will help you to remember that the lesson isn’t about what you’re going to do (‘Cover page 34’ or ‘Talk about the past tense’) but what the students are going to do, and why they’re doing it. 

A warmer and introduction, an example of the language in use, an activity with closed questions followed by one with open questions, ending in a fluency exercise and a review – your activities should come in a carefully planned order to ensure that the students are building their knowledge step by step towards using the language independently. Keep the students in mind for each phase of the lesson and your classes will be engaging and purposeful.

Discover Their Weaknesses

We all like doing things we’re good at and shy away from things we’re bad at, but don’t let a student’s reluctance put you off certain activities. It’s nice to be praised for getting things right, but if the activity was easy for the student, the celebration is unfairly won. How much more rewarding is it to receive praise for something you struggled with and had to work hard at? Whether it’s a particular skill (like pronunciation or grammar) or a topic that a student really struggles with, make sure they’re challenged in every class.

 Review

When you teach someone English, whether it’s a short course of just a few weeks or a long-term client who you teach for years, it’s important to check in with their progress and see how they’re doing. A mini review at the end of a lesson, or the start of the next class, is a great way to see what’s stuck in their short-term memory. However, it’s important to see what they remember in the long-term, too. Quick review questions can help inform you if they’re committing what they’ve learnt to long term memory. Also, make sure that you’re reviewing how close they are to reaching their goals – are they now at the CEFR level they wanted to be at? Have their goals changed?

Push Them

Remember that rule about 70%/30%? It’s important to get that balance right continually, not just in the first lesson. It can be tricky to pitch things appropriately to a group of learners, but in a one-to-one class, content can really be tailored to the student. Make sure that you’re keeping tabs on how the student is advancing. Are the activities you planned for them weeks ago still challenging, or do they need something fresh to spark motivation?

Relax

It sounds like there’s a lot to keep in mind here, but don’t get stressed out. You’re not a doctor – if a lesson goes badly, no-one is going to die. This long list of considerations when learning how to teach someone English may seem insurmountable at the start, but with a few months of teaching practice, it will become second nature. 

Even seasoned teachers need reminding of these tips from time to time (when they get set in their ways and pick up bad habits!) so in the beginning just remember to be practical. Reflect on how your teaching has gone after a lesson and see how you can improve, remembering that one bad lesson isn’t going to ruin a student’s progress – every class is a baby step up the mountain that is language learning, and you’ll be there to guide them along the way.

How Can Studying Abroad Make Your Dream Postgraduate Degree a Reality?

A Master’s degree can cost between $30,000 and $120,000 according to research by FinAid.org, an amount that can be unaffordable for the average graduate who is already saddled with debt. Not being able to afford a postgraduate degree can be frustrating for ambitious students, especially those who wish to make the biggest return from their investment in education. In the U.S., the gap in earnings between undergraduate and postgraduate degree holders is sizable, amounting to around 17% in areas such as software engineering and 22% in business (i.e. comparing a bachelor’s degree and a master’s degree). How can study abroad help you leap across this gap and enjoy a more fulfilling professional life back in the U.S.?

The Cost of Postgraduate Degrees Abroad

Law student Leo Cutting recently reported that the high costs of a year-long MA in the UK (around $5,000) was way beyond his means. Keen on pursuing an LLM in Public International Law, the keen student researched fees in other countries, finding that this qualification cost less than $1870 at the University of Leiden in the Netherlands. This university in particular has an excellent reputation on a worldwide scale, ranking within the world’s top 100 and ensconced between the dynamic student cities of Leiden and The Hague. The University has another bonus for foreign students: it is known for its international nature, with students from across the globe being attracted by its stringent standards and buzzing student lifestyle offerings.

Reducing Costs Further

The current pandemic is highlighting the utility (and the possibilities) of online education, both for school and university students alike. It is also sparking a stronger interest in online study for postgraduate degrees, bearing in mind the significant cost and time savings that can be made by choosing this option.

As stated in www.mydegreeguide.com, today’s students are looking to maximize return by opting for shorter degrees — including accelerated bachelor’s degrees, one-year doctorate programs and thesis-free Master’s degree. Opting for one of these accelerated degrees from an already more affordable university abroad can reduce costs further and enable you to continue working full- or part-time at home while getting significantly closer to your dream job.

Countries to Consider

Just a few countries that might be of interest if you are considering a postgraduate degree abroad include Italy and Spain. These countries are known for their sunny weather, rich cultural offerings, and active student social life. Other choices in Europe that blend a rich educational offer with cost-friendly living conditions are Lithuania, France, Germany, and Portugal. A Master’s degree in Spain costs anywhere from €300 to €3,500 per year. In Portugal, you can expect to pay between $950 and $1,300. If you will be working part-time, opt for tourism-friendly spots such as the Algarve in Portugal or Málaga in Spain. These areas have a high percentage of English speakers from abroad and vibrant communities comprising people from all over the world.

For many students, a Master’s degree or doctorate can be an impossible dream owing to the rising cost of education. Opting for a postgraduate degree abroad is a great way to learn a new language and immerse yourself in a culture while saving on the cost of education. Spain, Italy, and Portugal are just three places you might consider but you can probably build a far longer list of potential destinations.

Top 5 Reasons to Study Abroad with CAPA International Education


This guest post is written by Jessica, a college student, blogger, and recent CAPA International Education Alumnus.  Jessica spent six weeks studying International Marketing in London, England with CAPA during the summer session, and it was one of the most fulfilling experiences of her life.  Read on to see her Top 5 reasons to study abroad with Capa International Education.

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Study in Perth

 

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Study abroad programs in beautiful Perth Australia

Looking for a study destination with flexible study pathways, pristine beaches with the No. 1 student diversity in Australia?

Here are some of the reasons why you should choose Perth, Australia as your next study destin(HR RGB) Perth from above-Horizontal-resizedation!

Perth has been rated as one of the world’s top 10 most liveable cities (Economist Intelligence Unit, 2013), ranked in the top 10 per cent of 215 world cities for quality of life (Mercer, 2012) and top 30 Best Student Cities in the World (QS, 2013).

 

World-class education

Western Australia’s world-class universities, colleges and schools provide quality-assured education with flexible study pathways. The state’s practical approach to education, guided by teachers who are experts in their field, ensures that you are taught the skills that employers are looking for in today’s competitive world. Your study experience will not only provide you with learning, but also the possibility to be part of the growing academic and professional network that will guide the future of our city.

A lifestyle that’s hard to match!

Perth offers one of the highest standards of living in the world and yet is more affordable than the UK and the USA. As a student, you will receive a 40 per cent discount on all public transport throughout the state. Perth also has a relatively low crime rate compared to other major cities, making its campuses, transport and city streets safe and secure.

Most multicultural city in Australia

Perth is number one in Australia for student diversity. People of more tDSC_6028han 200 different nationalities live, work and study in Perth, speak over 170 languages and practise over 100 religions. There are numerous places of worship, with most restaurants and campuses catering for religious and dietary requirements. So, no matter where you’re from you’ll always feel welcome and respected.

 

 

Working in Perth

Perth has experienced an economic boom and is in the midst of a cultural rebirth. We currently generate around 19 per cent of Australia’s jobs, but have only 11 per cent of the population —meaning there’s never been a better time or place to find a job than right now, in Western Australia! Working in Perth while you study is not only a great way to earn some extra money. It will give you the chance to be part of our community and experience our way of life, and it’s also a fantastic way to work on your English language skills if you’re not a native speaker.

If you are on a student visa (a full-time international student), you will have the opportunity to work part time for up to 40 hours per fortnight and unlimited hours during semester break.

Making the most of your time in Perth

We value a balance of work and leisure in our lives and make the most of Australia’s open spaces with our city DSC_7642design and housing. The city centre is the home of business, as well as dozens of new bars, clubs and restaurants. Surrounding entertainment districts provide relaxed environments for music, theatre, festivals and cinema, and are minutes away from the peace and security of residential areas. Our Swan River, historic Fremantle port and King’s Park Botanic Gardens are the hub of outdoor recreation in the city, and our beaches are wide, pristine and welcoming.

Perth is at a unique point in its history and development. We are in a position to offer study choices, lifestyle benefits and career possibilities not available anywhere else, and in one of the most naturally beautiful destinations in the world. An education in Perth is a chance to be part of this exciting new future, no matter your goals and interests.

Search for your course today at www.studyperth.com.au.

StudyPerth is the first point of contact for anyone wishing to obtain information on studying and living in Perth, Australia.

Abroad101 Advertising Guide

Abroad101 is the first and largest study abroad review website.  Founded in 2007, our target audience is American university students looking for a semester or short-term abroad.  Much of our traffic and a majority of our reviews come from collaboration with university advisors who use us in their work with students to assure they receive academic credit for their experience.  Over 200 US colleges and universities promote Abroad101 to their students, over 140 have used our system to invite students to submit reviews.  Abroad101 serves as the official study abroad program evaluation tool at over 30 institutions who require  their students to submit their evaluations through our system.
Many of those who view Abroad101 are students and their parents,who are looking to validate their choices or expand on their initial selections.  If you are a program provider or offer a service related to American students studying abroad, Abroad101 offers affordable and cost-effective advertising to reach these students.
Click here to view the current Abroad101-Advertising_Guide or contact sales@abroad101.com for more details.

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Using your study abroad experience beyond college

Guest Posting By: Missy Gluckmann, Founder of MelibeeGlobal.com

Commencement-mania is here! It is that timeless season when students suffer from exhaustion, senioritis, relief and Facebook photo album induced nostalgia. Family and friends appear for celebrations, money is gifted and the job search is officially underway!

Students reflect on those moments that are impossible to replicate – the first time meeting a roommate, that first cafeteria meal (who will I sit with?), and the first class that required reading books and not chapters. For some, this will also include the first time getting on a plane to experience an academic program abroad. Memories will spill over…that first academic field trip on foreign soil, when you made your first “local” friend, the day you successfully ordered a coffee in a new language, and the first time you really understood that culture makes a difference. There were endless moments of learning and many were captured in your study abroad evaluation.

Being home for some time now, you have likely experienced re-entry shock – that feeling of discomfort, awareness, re-adjustment and sometimes plain ‘ol confusion that your home country is a bit harder to understand than you ever imagined! Please don’t worry – everyone goes through some form of re-entry – whether it is the mild kind (I miss the breakfast I ate abroad every morning) to the more difficult variety (I’m feeling straight up depressed and want to be abroad again NOW!) These videos may offer some comfort as you continue to reflect on your time abroad.

And now you’re home, constantly reminded that higher education is highly revered in the US. Being able to announce the job that you landed as a result of that degree or the graduate school that you were accepted to (hopefully, with a scholarship to enhance family bragging rights) is a rite of passage. The pressure that comes with the questions you hear daily – “You haven’t gotten a job yet?” or “Where are you interviewing?”- can make diving head first under the nearest rock seem like a completely reasonable move.

However, there are perks of this “down time,” despite the challenges of defining the next chapter of your journey. Without mainstream campus culture’s requirements of all-nighter study sessions, you now have time to reflect upon your education abroad experience and to revisit your published evaluation at StudyAbroad101.com. Reading back to your program review can provide some powerful memories. You can re-examine what you learned abroad and how those lessons can help you as you consider the path ahead.

Reflecting upon your own written words from your review and your own re-entry, you are able to consider how you’d answer those same questions today. While revisiting your review, I’d recommend taking out a piece of paper (or journal, if you write in one) and asking yourself these questions:

1)    Where have I grown the most?

2)    What three words would I use to describe how I’ve changed as a result of this experience abroad?

3)    What three skills learned abroad am I most of proud? Why?

4)    What data and skills learned from academic classes and experiences abroad am I still applying in my daily life?

5)    Am I satisfied with my level of knowledge from my academic program abroad or do I wish to pursue more?

6)    If applicable, have I continued developing my host country’s language skills? If not, what can I do to move that learning forward?

7)    What critical incidents abroad would I process differently now with some time and space behind me?

8)    How have those lessons impacted who I am and how I respond under pressure?

9)    What would I expand upon in my written evaluation if given a second chance to write it?

Reflecting on your review through these types of questions provides an opportunity to develop new goals. For example, if you reached a low intermediate level of Spanish abroad, perhaps now is the time to sign up for a language exchange in your community or to take a free online language program such as at www.duolingo. Or if you’ve discovered that you really enjoyed learning about your host country’s indigenous population, you may want to explore diversity more at home through volunteering or watching documentaries on the subject from your local library.

Your study abroad review, if thoughtfully written, also creates an opportunity to market yourself during networking and interviews. For example, when someone asks you about your time abroad, you can share your reflection driven “elevator speech” and offer to share your published review to illustrate your writing and analytical skills. This dialogue also creates a natural opportunity to ask for a business card or a LinkedIN invitation.

Reflection is an art form and your skillfully written words from your education abroad review are the canvas where you chose to paint your initial thoughts of self and skill developed as a critical part of the journey of crossing cultures. As you march boldly into the world seeking a job or the next level of education, remember to use the wisdom gleaned from experiences abroad. They can be a bridge to creating more opportunities than you ever imagined!

About the Author: Missy Gluckmann is the Founder of Melibee Global, which aims to elevate the discussion about education abroad, culture, diversity and the lifelong path to global citizenship by offering trailblazing tools, speakers and professional development for the global education and travel communities. Raised in New York, Missy has lived abroad three times and traveled to dozens of countries. Missy currently resides in North Carolina and experiences culture shock there on a daily basis! She can be followed on Facebook and Twitter.

Abroad101 Newsletter – Late Spring 2014

 

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Greetings,

It’s a busy time of year those of us working in study abroad; students returning from spring semester abroad, new students for the summer term, production of promotional material for the next season of recruiting and the ritual of marketing and advertising budgets. Abroad101 looks forward to being included in each of these steps and thanks you for taking a few moments to review our progress.

Reviews are Good for Students
This is a message you’ll be hearing a lot more from Abroad101 – published reviews are good for the student! A well-written published review is a testimonial of a student’s experience abroad and should be used to the student’s advantage well after they return to campus. A well-constructed thoughtful review will give students an edge with employers, grad schools, and in other potential post-graduate opportunities. Reviews provide an opportunity to showcase the student’s writing, analytical skills and allows the student to make personal statements about the impact of their experience and personal discoveries. For the student, the power of a published review comes from both a reflection of the past and a pledge to the future. Links to it from resumes, cover letters and online profiles (like LinkedIn) should help the student better leverage the abroad experience in the future.

For the students leaving on summer programs, we suggest you include mention of the review process as part of the pre-departure orientation and in early stages of advising. Getting them thinking about reviews early in the term is never a bad idea!

Get More Reviews Through Tools in your Abroad101 Providers Account
As students complete their time abroad, we encourage you to invite them to tell their story and submit program reviews to Abroad101. Using the “invite tool” from your Abroad101 account portal is the most effective way to draw reviews as the links in our email messages make it easier for students to find their program. The system also tracks their progress sending them timely reminders to complete the process, if needed. Our invite tool produces much higher completion rates than your own email reminders or newsletters, plus using it will eliminate duplication if university advisors have already invited their students to submit a review.

Update/Bolster your Directory Listings on Abroad101: Get us Photos – “Search by Subject” is coming
Whether you participate with free or paid listings, summer is a great time to update your directory entries on Abroad101. Next to reviews, photos are the best way to improve the performance of your listings and photos of students in action are the most popular. Each listing on Abroad101 has one feature photo position; a thumbnail of the image shows in the directory and a larger version on the program page. You can upload a photo to this position and add up to 10 others for a slide show for each program through your account login/portal on Abroad101.

Today, most users navigate the site using city and country search options and links. Some users are drawn to the advanced search feature when looking for program options. This summer we will rollout a “search by subject” enhancement that will give users another tool to find programs that meet their academic area of interest. Updating your listings to include these details will help students find your programs. The directory features are available to all providers with free or paid listings.

The Student Lead API is coming
It’s been a few months since we began sending student inquiries directly to providers, and the response has been great. Student feedback has been positive too as this new process gets prospective students a quicker response. For our advertisers, soon the process will be even faster through our Student Lead API. This summer, the gateway will be opened and specs will be released detailing how you can get the lead data posted right into your CRM system when a student completes the form on Abroad101. Then, with a little bit of ingenuity you’ll then be able to auto-respond and communicate with the student seconds after they’ve sent the inquiry. That should impress students and really improve conversion rates!

Let us be Your Exclusive Review Provider
Our review management tool was designed for university advisors, but with a little modification we can make it provider friendly too. Our system is very flexible and our tech team very capable, so in exchange for us processing all your student reviews, we’re willing to offer some added features and functionality. There may be some modest cost, depending on your requirements but nobody knows review tools like Abroad101 – let us build something for you!

Did you know that over 30 universities require their students to complete reviews on Abroad101? Administrators at these universities are provided with extra tools to compare and report their students’ progress. Students meanwhile would love to have to do only one review and have it available to both the university and the provider. Our second API, scheduled for fall release will look to pass reviews to and from the Abroad101 system. It will make the single review a much smoother process and give providers a better way to display Abroad101 reviews on your website.

You can see the list of the standard set of 37 review questions here: http://blog.studyabroad101.com/2014/05/advisors-and-providers-the-abroad101-study-abroad-review-questions/

Doing our Part to Grow Study Abroad
Abroad101 is in a position to help expand participation in education abroad. By publicizing our ratings, rankings and reviews we give students and their families a sense of security in going abroad. With messaging centered on the future benefits of a well-crafted review, we will push the virtues of the international experience to employers, helping dispel some of the negative stereotypes of study abroad.

Another initiative is designed to provide direct support to students through a partnership we launched with GoEnnounce, an education oriented crowd-funding platform. The initiative sponsors one student each week, showcasing their mission to study abroad and proving them with a small amount of seed money. In turn, the families and supporters of the student will be asked to also contribute. Using reviews as an education tool, we intend to show those in the student’s direct circle some real life examples of the chosen program’s impact on similar young adults. When you see a link for our student of the week, please click it and please consider a modest contribution to help bring one more student abroad. One by one, step by step, we can build the numbers of students abroad and break down barriers that keep students from believing they can participate. Your contributions mean more than money; they are votes of confidence that ripple out to that student’s circle of support.

Your can read more about this initiative in the Abroad101 partnership with GoEnnounce press release – http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/05/prweb11829272.htm
or the “Crowd Funding for Study Abroad” article in The PIE News. http://thepienews.com/news/abroad101-sponsors-crowd-funding-campaigns/

Visit the Abroad101 booth (#1048) at NAFSA
If you are headed to NAFSA, please visit the exhibit hall and visit Abroad101 booth to pick up a few of the soon to be collectable Abroad101 T-Shirts. Not only will we have the usual heavy-duty men’s style, we’ll have lots of WOMEN’S cut T-Shirts. Bring some home for the interns and they’ll be sure to update those free listings!

Stop by and say hello to both Mark and Sherry Shay, you’ll find us in booth #1048 at the back of row 1000.

Press Release: Abroad101 and GoEnnounce Launch Student of the Week Sponsorship

Two Pioneering Websites Join to Help Students Fund Their Study Abroad Dreams

New York, NY (PRWEB) May 08, 2014

GoEnnounce, a platform for students to “ennounce” and track their educational achievements and fundraise for goals, and Abroad101, the world’s first and largest study abroad review website have launched the “Abroad101 Student of the Week” initiative, designed to help more students study abroad. The partnering education startups are tackling one of the primary barriers to study abroad– cost.

Each week, a student who created a “Mission” for a study abroad program on GoEnnounce will be selected. Abroad101 will contribute cash to the selected student’s fundraising efforts and promote that student’s GoEnnounce page through Abroad101’s connections in the study abroad field. The student’s “Mission” will link to their desired study abroad program’s reviews on Abroad101 allowing the student’s followers (friends and family) to read and gain insight as to the student’s choice.

The first student selected as the “Abroad101 Student of the Week” is Natalie Bahr, a sophomore at Concordia University Texas, who was accepted to an intensive study abroad program in the heart of Shanghai, China. She will immerse herself in the culture and society, while picking up eight credits towards her degree. With dreams of becoming an elementary school teacher, she thinks the knowledge and skills she will acquire on this trip will make her an even more effective teacher.

Melissa Davis, co-founder of GoEnnouce stated, “This project is an example of the power of an academically focused social media platform, in which a student’s followers can not only track the progress of the student, but also help contribute to the student’s goals.” Using a practice commonly referred to as “crowdfunding”, GoEnnounce gives students the tools to share a fundraising “Mission” with their network, and then collect donations online from the “crowd.” According to Davis, “The Abroad101 Student of the Week project will help many ambitious, hard-working students achieve their lifetime goal of studying abroad. Partnering with a well-connected company like Abroad101 will not only help individual students, but we also expect it to motivate additional students to start their own fundraising “Missions” to study abroad.”

Abroad101’s CEO Mark Shay points out that many parents and family members who may not have gone to college or studied abroad themselves have a hard time understanding the benefits of an international immersion. According to Shay, “We have more than 20,000 reviews on Abroad101, and each tells a story of a young person’s success, individual achievement and self-improvement. By bringing these experiences to the attention of future students and their supporters, we increase the awareness of the benefits of an experience abroad. Former students become virtual role models for future students and this helps draw friends and family to join the circle. It’s a very positive application of technology and social networking to help the dreams of tomorrow’s generation,” said Shay.

About Abroad101
Founded in 2007, Abroad101 is the first and largest study abroad review website. Focusing on American college students looking for a semester or term abroad, this innovative platform connects past and future students, parents and advisors and program providers through its market-leading online evaluation tool. Abroad101 grew from one partnership at Tufts University in 2007 to over 215 college partnerships today. The Abroad101 directory of study abroad programs is the most comprehensive database in the field today. Click to learn more about Abroad101’s Study Abroad Programs, Rankings, Ratings and Reviews

About GoEnnounce
GoEnnounce gives students a place to tell their educational stories with their family, friends and mentors. It is a way for students to track and share their achievements, projects, and goals with their network to get the encouragement and financial help they need to succeed. All students’ school and extracurricular ‘ennoucement’ updates are saved in a social e-portfolio environment. A student’s followers can respond with likes, comments and even rewards into a college savings account. At anytime, a student can launch a fundraiser, to collect donations for goals and expenses. Click to learn more about the GoEnnounce’s social e-portfolio