Generation Study Abroad

girl holding generation sab sign

Abroad101 has joined IIE’s Generation Study Abroad with the hopes of doubling the number of American students who go abroad.  The following article comes courtesy of IIE and hopefully brings more students and their parents to believe that study abroad is an essential part of the college experience.

Top 5 Reasons to Study Abroad

We believe that study abroad should be an essential component of a college degree, however according to the Open Doors 2013 Report on International and Educational Exchange less than 10% of the 2.6 million graduates last year studied abroad. It’s time to make a change and give all students what they need to succeed in today’s interconnected world!

  1. Globalization is changing the way the world works. Employers increasingly seek workers who have both cross-cultural skills and cutting-edge technical skills.
  1. Competency in languages other than English is increasingly important. Today’s graduates are just as likely to work with people from Beijing and Bangalore as those from Boston or Boise, making the ability to work across cultures essential to success in all arenas.
  1. Study abroad opens students’ eyes to new ways of thinking, instilling a more informed approach to problem-solving in cross-cultural contexts.
  1. Many of the world’s most influential innovations are originating from the collaboration of cross-cultural teams, often located continents away.
  1. Study abroad has been shown to improve grades, boost confidence, and help with college graduation and retention rates.

#GenerationStudyAbroad | www.generationstudyabroad.org
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My Summer in Lima, Peru was one I will never forget!

 

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5 stars

 

 

 

5 out of 5
ISA Study Abroad in Lima, Peru
A student (Biomedical Engineering, Michigan Technological University)

I would definitely recommend this program. I had an incredible experience combining Study Abroad with Service Learning in El Hospital del Nino while staying with a Peruvian host family. My language skills improved immensely, I gained an appreciation for the Peruvian culture, and met wonderful people from around the world.

Study here: https://www.studyabroad101.com/programs/isa-study-abroad-in-lima-peru

 

Cool Program of the Week in Dublin Ireland

Ireland-Dublin-bostonUCool Program of the Week: Boston University Internship in Dublin

The Dublin Internship Program offers a semester of study and work in one of Europe’s most cosmopolitan cities. Based at Dublin City University (DCU), the program combines a professional internship with coursework on various aspects of Ireland’s dynamic history and contemporary culture, including its art, economy, literature, media and politics. The fall Semester also offers a track specifically designed for those students interested in the health sciences. Courses designed specifically for students in the Boston University program are taught by local faculty drawn from Dublin-area universities and professional institutes.

Students who have participated in this program have commented that “this was the best three and half months of their college experience,” and was an “unparalleled experience of personal growth.”

Read more about this program and full reviews on the Abroad101 Dublin Internship page.

 

 

Program Curriculum

Students have a one-week semester break in between the two phases.

Week 1–Week 7 (Core Phase)

During the first part of the program, students take two required core courses, while also starting the elective that runs the length of the 15-week program. Students also meet with the program’s internship advisors in order to be placed according to ability, professional goals, experience, work habits, and availability of local appointments.

Week 8–Week 15 (Internship Phase)

During the final seven weeks, students participate in internships with organizations in the greater Dublin area, and enroll in a four-credit internship seminar. Students work full-time, four days per week, while also continuing the elective course. Placements are contingent upon the student’s past experiences, professional interest, and available opportunities in any given semester; flexibility is essential.